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will the global economy go next and what will it mean to your portfolio as the u.s. stock market sets a new five-year high. >>> i'll have any candid conversation with outspoken jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon. we'll talk real estate, banking, his pay cut. >> we had run terrible year. >>> and she's called the oprah of china. remarkable entrepreneur who runs a media empire and reaches more than 200 million people a month. "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >> this is what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." washington has a new watchdog for wall street. president obama has nominated mary jo white the head of securities and exchange commission. white is a former prosecutor with a reputation for toughness. she will replace mary schapiro and must still be confirmed by the senate. timothy geithner spent his last day as secretary on friday, stepping down after a tumultuous four years in the financial system. president obama's chief of staff jack lew has been nominated to replace geithner. >>
the economy, about where the markets would go post financial crisis. what's next for america and the global economy? ken rogoff joining me once again with some answers. ken, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. how would you describe the mood in davos and how would you see the economy today five years post the crisis? >> it's a strange mood in davos, where people are not euphoric. in fact, you talk to heads of multinational corporations, businesspeople around the world, they say, you know, things aren't even as good as i thought they would be this quarter, but they're calmer. there's a feeling that the world is not going to fall apart. you hear more about geopolitical risk, cyber security, d less about europe's going to blow up tomorrow. >> so, you're not seeing over enthusiasm but it's certainly better than a year ago? >> yes, it's definitely, definitely calmer. their theme here is resilient. yes, and dynamism, not so much. guess what i thought about the global economy. i actually think that growth will be moderate with not necessarily a lot of volatility
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
driven economy to consumption. so you're probably not going to see double digit growth but i think 8% is in the cards. >> is the u.s. still the best place? >> yes. >> to invest, guys? >> mandy, what is frightening here is that we all agree that some of the best opportunities are overseas. perhaps those markets need to play catch up here. i would also add that commodities have been an area left in the dust. if the fed is very successful, igniting inflation, which may be in the cards in the future commodities would be a place to hedge someone's portfolio as they get out of bonds into equities right now. very quickly we're noting today apple is, let me put it this way. exxon is close to overtaking apple as the most valuable stock in the world. significant at all? are you guys watching that at all? >> we are watching it. it is old schools coming back to modern day trading markets that are here. we've all watched apple. we've seen the run in apple. everyone is very familiar with the stock and the products. it just got to prices that were way too lofty for retail investors and when we star
great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> what have we learned from 50 years of franco-german friendship? our greatest problems can be solved when w
economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we wanted to remain that way. the political debated home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an e
the of the bank of israel on keeping his economy strong and safe in a very volatile region. david: microsoft is out. the numbers are out. adam shapiro, how do they look? >> well it's a beat on earnings, david, but a miss on revenue. earnings, 81 cents per share. the street was expecting 75 cents. revenue 21.46 billion. the street was expecting 21.53 billion. jumping in real quick on the press release they're talking about it, in the last quarter, in the server and tools business, saw increase 8.5 billion. the previouser, server and tools business reported 9.1 billion of revenue. 9% increase from the prior period year-over-year. we'll jump in to see how windows 8 is performing but they're missing on revenue. sandra: we'll keep watching the stock here in after-hours trading. looks like it is getting a little bit of a boost in after-hours trading so we'll keep looking at those numbers. keep in mind the revenues numbers fell short but the earnings per share did beat. it is a decent beat. it is six pennies. let's get to the market panel. scott bower in the pits of the cme group in chicago. we hav
actually a friend of the system and the economy. take a listen to this one. >> i think jpmorgan was a -- was not just a fair weather friend. we were there in good times and bad times for everybody, including nations. for spain and italy we will tell you -- we were lending $15 billion net of collateral. net derivatives, spain and italy. yes, it's governments and multi- nationals if you want to be transparent. what would you do? what would you all do? if you were my board of directors, it's easy to say don't take the risk. move out. we've been in spain and italy, one for 60 years, wur finish over 100 -- one for over 100. we're not a fair weather friend. companies want us there. we have to manage that risk. something may go wrong. >> got to tell you guys, the feedback after that panel was actually not good. a lot of people criticizing jamie just in the hallways. obviously a lot of people happy to see him defending the bank. a lot of bankers here. the mood, nature of where we are. there was some criticism. the other big news, by the way, not happening in davos -- yeah? >> i was goin
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
is the economy is getting better. the equity markets have improved. standard & poor's 500 was up. the s&p 500 was up 13%, 14%, up 4% year to date. >> right. >> the economy is starting to show good signs. as long as we don't have it derailed in washington. >> i was just going to ask. >> i think things could get better. >> could washington still screw this up? >> absolutely. i don't think it takes much to have another debt ceiling debate and debacle would not be helpful here. i think there's so much minon the sidelines between the retail investor and the corporate america today, has so much money to invest. get rid of some of that uncertainty and this economy will go. i'm quite bullish about that. >> can you provide guidance for this year without knowing exactly what washington is going to come up with? >> we gave a range. we don't give guidance. we give a range on a conservative side and optimistic side. we're right inside that range. had a great start to the year. we're ahead of consensus. we her record asset gathering and record guidance sales and great control. had a great start. >> had a g
believes that's going to be the major thing to turn around the japanese economy. cheryl: i mean it's almost a currency war, if you will. i mean they are getting into a very crowded space, and with the pressure that we have seen in particular on the dollar, over the last two years, i mean, i'm wondering what that means for us. >> absolutely. they are starting to step on the toes of the fed. you know, the fed has been really priming the pump here, printing money, printing money in efforts to keep the dollar as weak as possible in this risk off type scenario market. so now some of these other central banks are now starting to fight back a bit, and the bank of japan has probably been the most aggressive in doing so with some of the easing that they have already done. cheryl: do you think they will do more easing? is that what you think is going to be the headline here? >> we have pretty much baked into the cake that they will be raising the inflation target to 2% from 1%. they are probably going to extend their asset purchases. they're really talking about different measures to dramatically wea
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
by bloomberg, 36% said america's fiscal woes are the biggest threat to the world economy, more than the 29% who named the european debt crisis. anthony mason is attending a meeting of world bankers in davos, switzerland. >> reporter: how strong do you think the u.s. economy actually is right now? >> i think the u.s. economy wants to be strong. >> reporter: but mary callahan erdoes says the bickering in washington is holding it back. erdos is one of the most powerful women on wall street. as c.e.o. of j.p. morgan asset management, she presides over $1.2 trillion in investments. >> the u.s. has to realize it's got so much going for it. let's just get ourselves to come together as a team, one team running that country, helping to get itself back on stable footing which then cascades to the rest of the world. >> reporter: how much does it hurt the economy if we don't confront this? >> it hurts us tremendously. it hurts the confidence of the u.s., it hurts the confidence of the c.e.o.s to know how do i invest? what are the rules going to be? and we've got to get back to believing that business is go
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
hillary clinton testifying on the benghazi attack. melissa: is the economy and low beer? we have an exclusive interview with the american trucking corporation bill graves. lori: the big apple shrinking? the new trend of micro- apartments in manhattan. 250 square feet. melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange where nicole petallides is standing by. nicole: i saw pictures of those apartments, i would love to buy one. they actually look very cute. let's take a look at some of the earnings related names. let's start at mcdonald's. it is up about a half% here. they expect the management -- that is not great news there. you can see the up arrow. when you talk about airlines they are up about three and a 3%. good news there despite the fact that superstar did actually cripple operations for some time. despite that, they did come in with an income of 37 billion compared with 18 million year-over-year. that is why you are seeing it up over 3%. united technologies which is to the upside. hitting 52 week highs today. you
with their best strategy and the outcome for both the market and the economy. don't go anywhere. more "money" coming up. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares re, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. lori: all right. back to business in washington now republicans hold a big vote to whether or not to extend the debt limit until may. if congress doesn't pass a budget by april 15th they no longer get paid! i have no problem with that. our panel is here with their take on the strategy. we have our favorite economist, peter morici. the always amazing scott martin, chief market strategist with united advisors and former democratic congressman
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. sandra: you think our ranking crisis was ba back in 2008? it was, but imagine iceland. their three against banks failed. they just failed, the banks of the same leveraged that our state of the governments took the opposite approach of the u.s. so did the world end? hardly so, david. david: the world economic forum with a leader who had to make that tough choice. liz: david, the world hardly froze up and ended for iceland. sure, they had majo have major , 10% unemployment, 90% of the value lost, but today it is a much different story. we want to hear about this from the president of iceland. welcome, mr. president. >> thank you. liz: in the u.s. a lot of people still wonder what would have happened if we had let our banks fail. i know is a completely different scale, but talk about your experience and back then in 2800 google did was to allow something like that to happen. >> even though the scale is different in iceland, whether they are at large, small, they face simil
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
the american, the japanese and american economy. there is going to be hell to pay and it's going to happen soon. >> you're holding your news and buying. >> neil henessey, can we get back to all-time highs for the dow and the s&p. >> oh, michelle, i think easily. if you look at the dow jones right now, the price-to-sales ratio is 1.28. the most it will go up to is 1.5 so that leaves 17% on the upside or if hundred points. more importantly you look at the s&p 500 companies, they are sitting on 1.5 trillion in cash, 1.5 trillion -- >> hold on. you think 2,300 points in the dow? what are you talking about? >> very much so. >> i mean. you're talking about the high in 2007, michelle, was when the price-to-sales ratio of the dow jones was at 1.8. we're 40% away from that number, but, i mean, the companies are in great shape. there's so much cash sitting on the sidelines, and at some point in time the investors are going to get out of fix the income and move over towards equity. >> can i ask you a question and i'm very much concerned about this. what happens when the bond bubble bursts and those invest
your sense of what's going on in terms of the global economy. how do you see things? >> sure. why don't we start in europe. europe remains a challenging place. i think that the actions that mr. draghi took have technically been very strong. i think they have put a safety net under the market, but i think the challenge, is and it's one of the big topics here, is how do we get growth back into these economies. fundamentally that's what we need to do, and i don't think there's a clear path to that but it will take some time. >> been a tough couple of years. >> yes, it has. >> let's talk about citi, you're repositioning the firm. how are you planning on doing that and what's the vision going forward? >> our strategy, maria, is really focused around a few of the big secular things going on in the world. globalization, urbanization and digitization. if you think of globalization, thinking of what's going on in the economy, most of the growth is coming from the developing countries. you look at 2008 to 2012, 45% of world growth came from china. a trend we're going to continue to see the next
minister is going to put britain after years of uncertainty and take a huge gamble with our economy. he is running scared of ukip, and he cannot deliver for britain. >> i have a polite to say to the right honorable gentleman that his whole argument about there being uncertainty is fatally undermined by the fact that he cannot answer whether he wants a referendum or not. can i give him a little bit of advice? he needs to go away, get a policy, come back and tell us what it is. in the meantime, our approach is what the british people want. it is right for business, it is right for our economy, and we will fight for it. >> and around the world, 170 million children under the age of five are stunted. that means that they are so malnourished that it has affected their physical and possibly their cognitive development. the world has enough food for everyone. as leading non-governmental organizations such as saving the children watch a major campaign, will the prime minister tell us what action the cable taking during its presidency of the g eight? >> my honorable friend is absolutely right to
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
areas of agreement between myself, i am a conservative, and don. we both agreed that this economy will do well because of energy. we both believe it is on the upswing because of housing. >> that is all you have to say? stuart: we also agree on taxes. >> we should have a free enterprise, free market system. stuart: why are you such a supporter of the most leftist president in american history? >> it is not just a chief financial officer, it is a leader of our nation. he has no peers when it comes to any other candidate on the republican side or any other republican sitting in the senate. we are out of time. connell: good morning, everyone. i am connell mcshane. dagen: i am dagen mcdowell. things are looking up on the jobs front. connell: monica crowley. dagen: dreamliner, the troubles have not gone away for boeing. michael dell has ordered one of them. connell: then there is jamie dimon and john chambers. you will be hearing from both of them in this hour. liz claman at the world economic forum. cheryl: stocks now and every 15 minutes. apple. nicole: i will show you apple in a mome
and you really do, you've got the makings of an upbeat, an up tick in america's economy, do you see it my way? >> i see it your way, this is very good news. we're on that road, stuart. but we cannot put politics completely to the side. our road has lots of potholes, lots of road blocks and possibly has a lot of tolls along the way. so, i think the biggest threat to the recovery happens to be our own government. >> yes, but -- and i'm just suggesting that if we build that pipeline and if we allow more fracking, you could have an energy based jobs recovery, i know that those are big if's, but i think we could get it if we get the pipeline and more fracking. go ahead, last word to you on this one. >> right, right, we have that, but also on the other side, remember what's going on internationally. we have a race to the bottom in terms of a currency war. right now, the dollar is going to start to strengthen from my opinion and i think when that happens, a lot of the companies that export are going to be hit, they have really good years last year, and with the weak dollar so we have the energy
is positive, and if you start looking at how the businesses and the economy is doing and juxtapose that against the politicians who aren't behaving very well, you have to be positive regarding the situation for the future stocks. >> so you like stocks more for the fundamentals than you do for any fed or congressional action right now. am i reading that right? >> absolutely, absolutely. i mean, for the third quarter of last year our stocks had earnings of over 6% which compares very favorable, and, you know, we're looking into the future and then we compare that to the general growth rates of the u.s. economy, and there's no question they are going to outperform so it has an impact. >> the imf lowered global growth numbers today, nobody seems to care because the money has to go some place and it's not going into the bond market. >> point well taken. in the past you talked about gold. >> was that long winded? >> we're about 15%, 20% in gold right now. listen, this is a stagflationry environment. going to get a lot worse. you have to own gold and oil. >> be globally diversified and mu
, republicans seem intent on keeping the country's economy as unstable as possible. the house averted the debt ceiling fight. at least some republicans. 33 members of the house gop still broke rank. by averting, we, of course, mean punting the ticking time bomb three months down the road. >> another 90 days away so we can continue to royle this congress, this country, our people, and our economy. >> we should not even be having a debate. it should be no doubt that the full faith and credit of the united states will be honored, and that is what our constitution says. >> the gimmick nature of this whole thing i won't elaborate on, has been done before. >> either way, the passage of this bill has allowed lawmakers to skip from brinkmanship to probably more brinkmanship. looming just over the horizon is a budget battle that could shut down the government and automatic steep spending cuts that could cost thousands of jobs. welcome to the new normal in washington. joining us now from davos, switzerland, is cnbc's squawk box co-host "new york times" columnist and author of too big to fail, andrew ros
soros said that he was not impressed with stimulus uppers to fix the global economy. -- effort to fix the global economy. >> most of the top has been about the global economic malaise. it is the home of the world economic forum based in the height of switzerland and year. the main focus has been on the eurozone and whether or not there are any green shoots of recovery. >> more than 1000 delegates have taught here over the course of five days for the ways to kill them. bill of the dream was resilient dynamism. there is plenty to plenty of resilience a little dynamism the added value is for global leaders from the public and the private side to get together and exchange ideas. people come back from here, a batteriesed,, loaded. >> the form called for an unprecedented $14 trillion dollars to make environmentally friendly. without decisive steps to protect the plan, sustainable growth cannot be guaranteed. >> the other big prices is the referendum on the european union and the crisis in the eurozone. it ranged high all week. they set out their visions for economic recovery. >> as my colle
the budget, how to grow the economy. that's the kind of debate the country desevens. by the way, if we keep going down this path, we will have a debt crisis. it's not an if question, it's a when question. >> i remember him, alternativest young congressman from wisconsin that used to come on "squawk box." >> still fighting budget balthsds. >> if he's going to go on somewhere, at least he went on with david. congress must pass a stopgap spending bill by march 27th to keep the u.s. government running. and don't do that with your sneezes. >> what was that? i held it in. >> that's like -- >> i've been trying to hold it in because you were talking. >> no, no, it's going to come out. that's bad for you. something inside is going to pop or something. like an anneurism. it's bad to be repressed like that. let it out. >> that's his whole life. >> oh. >> let it out. >> michelle caruso ka brar ray. you're like a guest on the show, but thank you for being kind. >> it's the greatest feeling in the world. let it out. >> yeah, others have -- anyway, more trouble in egypt, a state of emergency has been decl
market economy and grow the business in a slow growth world economy. again, reflecting slow growth overall. i think they had strong numbers when it came to agency. some of those numbers up by 18%. volume was driven by agriculture with robust tales in latin america and a strong selling to the north american selling season along with increases in asia pacific for performance materials, electronics and communications and performance chemicals. >> the stock was higher a year and a half ago or so. but in terms of the last year, it's getting -- it's sort of the in the mid point of the trend. coming back, at least trying to get back to where it was earlier. all-time highs are at about 58. >> in corporate headlines, more developments in the boeing story. there are indications now that the dream liner could stay grounded longer than initially anticipated. investigators turning to the maker of the lithium ion batteries that are used in the planes. that is gsyausa. investigators visited the batterymaker yesterday. shares of boeing have started getting to the low end of the range after some ch
. >> thanks so much, bill. we are talking economy and politics with representative eric cantor right now, and representative, great to have you on the program. >> great to be here with you. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> let's get right to t.yesterday or this week rather the house passed a debt limit extension until mid-may. what does that buy us? >> well, what is buys us is a time for this debate about borrowing and spending to really develop into what i hope will be a robust discussion that will yield some results. we know that for almost four years the united states senate has not passed a budget, and that's part of the problem that's been contributing to the out-of-control spending in washington, and what we've said is we will extend the debt ceiling for three months to allow time for the united states senate to write a budget so we can then begin the discussions on how we're going to repay this money that we're going to borrow as well as begin to manage down the debt long term. >> what's the realistic vision in terms of a budget? i mean, this senate will have its budget pla
the big roll the private sector is playing in the rebuilding of his country and his economy. david: before we get started on this hour, we want to tell you what drove the markets with today's data. a sea of green on wall street with all three major indices ending week higher. dow, s&p and nasdaq posting a fourth straight week of gains the dow is the week's winner, closing up 1.%. all 10 s&p sectors ending the trading day higher led by consumer discretionary and energy. the euro hitting a 11-month high versus the dollar after the ecb said banks will pay back loans faster than expected. euro rising to $1.34 in intraday trading against the greenback. >>> new home sales as we mentioned before falling last month dropping to an annual rate of 3509,000. that is last month's drop did not derail the previous gains. housing sales posted the best year since 2009, jumping 20% from a year ago, sandy. >> we have our market panel. jeff saut, chief investment strategist at raymond james. david steinberg, dls capital managing partner. let's first start with mark. the take on the rally here. it is good news
's a lot of run here and profit taking, but a lot of things going for us, the economy, employment, housing in particular, and, actually, don't forget the fact there's a little taunt between the congress and president right now as far as the debt ceiling goes. >> what's that do to economic growth. i mean, many economists say, you know, the debt ceiling debate, no matter what the fiscal cliff deal, take your pick, is going to shave half a percent of gdp in the first quarter of 2013. >> you know what, this is going to sound terrible, i don't put faith in what economists said. over the past two years, going into two double dip recessions. never came about. they don't have a handle on what's going on. investor and consumer confidence is better than anticipated. we'll do well. >> washington, we need tome -- to keep it going. a lot happening now in the oil market, especially with wti, michael, and in particular, the seaway, unclogging, if you will, of crude supplies another inventory build on our hands do you think? >> you know, tell you what, cheryl, i was with traders over the week, and we had
. there is definitely a lot of momentum the upside. it is a sign that the economy is improving. there is a large speculation that oil demand will improve. a lot of traders do think that we have hired to go here. the rest of the energy market, gasoline futures are spiking as there is word that one of the major east coast refineries. natural gas prices down 4% in today's trading session. guys, we are nearing $100 a barrel, as far as oil prices are concerned. melissa: sandra smith, thank you so much. lori: three-week since boeing 787 had its latest incident. investigator is shifting our focus. we have the latest details just ahead. melissa: the s&p holding their five year high. ♪ the local melissa: it is time to make money with charles payne. charles: i accidentally went to ugg store. we just dumped into the door. what? i could not believe that you know, you do not like to do things on this anecdotal thing. the last time i went to a retail store that crowded with that type of enthusiasm and electricity was back in 2002. steve madden. the place was buzzing. i cracked a few jokes. no one even knew
population, a serious drain on the company's economy. frequent "varney & company" guest summed up japan's predicament in an interesting way, listen to this. >> you can see anecdotally they sell more adult diaper products than infant. stuart: is that true? >> yes, it is. stuart: wow, indeed. that's the dire situation in japan. contrast that with the united states. our proportion of old people far, far lower than japan, and lower than europe, too. a big part of that is because of immigran immigrants. now this, the former head of the head of the city teacher's union, that was years ago, she is, however, randy weingarten, now the head of the federation of teachers which is a part of the afl-cio and joins us in the next hour, and topic number one, the six-figure payout. we follow microsoft on this program, i own some of that stuff and we talked to an executive who had the ear of bill gates, he says microsoft chief steve ballmer has to go. also coming up, big news i should say from two names you know, google and ibm, we're following both of them at the opening bell. may, everybody, cheer up,
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
minneapolis. >>> from weather to the economy, you hope the world economy is on wall street, but now in switzerland. many are in davos for the annual world economic forum but this year their focus is not on europe. anthony mason joins us from davos. anthony good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. maybe it's the bracing mountain air but there's been a pronounced mood swing in davos. 12 months ago it looked like the financial collapse in europe could lead to a global recession. what a difference a year makes. in the hallways and meeting rooms of the world economic forum where top bankers, business leaders and politicians come every year to swap intelligence there's a sense the global economy has finally turned a corner. as ken frazier, ceo of pharmaceutical giant merck. >> i think the u.s. economy is poised to take off. i think it's been through some tough times. i think it's the strongest economy in the world. >> reporter: the imf forecasts the global economy will grow 3.5% this year a healthy number, and if there's debate about how soon things will ge
low, but a guest said, look, washington is going to mess up the economy. the sequestering issue is prevalent, and the debt ceiling debate is going to further erode consumer confidence, people will not spend, and the rally might be in jeopardy. i'm a real basking of hopefulness and positivity. >> thank you so much. the unions, lou dobbs weighs in on dwindling union membership, but to the point, there's a rally holding on, but a rally nonetheless. >> that's right. the s&p right now, which was above 1500, 1502 to be exact a short time ago, back to the levels we saw in 2007. we're trying to hang on to the rally, but thinking the dow was up more than a hundred points, and now it's up 3 dlsh 4 -- 41. >> will the markets hold on despite with what's going on with apple breaking down? clinging to green, approached the 1500 level not seen in years. if we end higher, that's the 7th consecutive day of gains, the longest winning streak in more than six years for the s&p. >> and no longer the apple of wall street's eye. it pummeledded as they posted the fourth most profitable company ever. >>
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syr
economy in davos, switzerland. why should you care? it all has to dowith your dollars and cents. >>> so does this. some stores are now charging you more to use your credit cards. we'll tell you why. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer through 6 months. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events, including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if yo
to let the country go off the fiscal cliff. he's not going to hurt the economy. he's not going to allow that to happen. chris: is he in control? >> that's the big question. chris: "national journal." a lot of reporting now that what's going to happen the republicans are going to go with -- they're going to let defense cuts take effect because that means a lot of the domestic cuts take effect which is conservativism and getting their way. also possibly hurting the economy. although that's a conspiratorial notion on my part. what are the republicans going to do? big issue coming up. >> we reported this week that they're going -- the moving toward letting those across the board cuts go in and this is the best shot we have at it. budget control. it's going to become the law. march 1. so there's no debate about that. and to undo them, democrats are demanding tax increases. and republicans are saying no way. chris: an expert on capitol hill. kelly. what do you think -- when you go around and just chat with people, do you sense that there is this cracking of ice that maybe we should have a han
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